Crisis Text Line – www.crisistextline.org

Your best friend. Your dad. That lady down the street. That quiet kid in school. That loud kid in school. That dude in accounting. Your cousin in Alaska. That hipster in the flannel in Brooklyn. That rando who might lurk online. Crisis Text Line is for everyone.

Crisis Text Line is free, 24/7 support for those in crisis. Text 741741 from anywhere in the USA to text with a trained Crisis Counselor.

Ohio is making it easier for individuals who are experiencing a stressful situation to find immediate help, 24/7 with the launch of a free, confidential, statewide Crisis Text Line. Starting today, any Ohio resident who needs help coping with a crisis can now text the keyword “4hope” to 741741 to be connected to a crisis counselor. Trained crisis counselors are on stand-by to provide a personal response and information on a range of issues, including: suicidal thoughts, bullying, depression, self-harm, and more. The specialist helps the user stay safe and healthy with effective, secure support. The keyword “4hope” was developed by the Stark County Mental Health and Addiction Recovery (StarkMHAR) board, which piloted a crisis text line for youth and young adults as part of the Strong Families, Safe Communities funding initiative supported by OhioMHAS and the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities.

Our Principles

  1. We fight for the texter. Our first priority is helping people move from a hot moment to a cool calm, guiding you to create a plan to stay safe and healthy. YOU = our priority.
  2. We believe data science and technology make us faster and more accurate. See our Founder’s TED talk for more scoop on how we’re using this stuff. While we love data science and technology, we don’t think robots make great Crisis Counselors. Instead, we use this stuff to make us faster and more accurate–but every text is viewed by a human.
  3. We believe in open collaboration. We share our learnings in newsletters, at conferences and on social media. And, we’ve opened our data to help fuel other people’s work.

OUR APPROACH

Q: IS CRISIS TEXT LINE COUNSELING?

A: No, our specialists do not counsel, but rather practice active listening to help texters move from a hot moment to a cool calm.

Q: WHAT IS ACTIVE LISTENING?

A: Active listening is when someone communicates in a way that is empathetic, understanding, and respectful. It includes focus on the texter and thoughtful answers.

Q: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN CRISIS TEXT LINE AND THERAPY?

A: Crisis Text Line is not a replacement for therapy. Therapy includes a diagnosis made by a doctor, a treatment plan of action, and a patient/therapist relationship. Crisis Text Line helps people in moments of crisis. Our crisis counselors practice active listening to help our texters find calm and create an action plan for themselves to continue to feel better. Crisis Text Line’s crisis counselors are not therapists.

Q: WHO STARTED CRISIS TEXT LINE?

A: We were founded by our CEO, Nancy Lublin. After seeing a need for the service we provide, Nancy hired a team to build what is our current platform. The original team included a data scientist and an engineer. Hear our story here.

The Things Adults Say That Hurt Instead of Help

Going back to school is an exciting time for kids and teens, but it can also be a stressful time.

There’s not just the stress of fitting in and getting good grades. But, also the threat of bullying that can threaten students’ emotional and physical safety at school.

Sometimes this stress can even turn into a mental health disorder. In fact, as many as 12 million young people are diagnosed with a mental health disorder in a given year.

Mental Health America (MHA) is working to lower that number and keep kids mentally healthier this school year. Our revolutionary online screening program provides one of the quickest and easiest ways to determine whether your child, student, or friend is experiencing symptoms of a mental health condition.

The Parent Screen is for parents of young people to determine if their child’s emotions, attention, or behaviors might be signs of a problem. Our Youth Screen is for young people (age 11-17) who are concerned that their emotions, attention, or behaviors might be a sign of a problem.

Mental health disorders in children are treatable. The early identification, diagnosis, and treatment that MHA advocates can help more kids reach their full potential this school year—and beyond!  Click here to be redirected to the MHA website containing this information.

The Risk of Addiction in the Transgender Community: Embracing Your Identity While Coping with Addiction

The transgender community faces extraordinary challenges. Struggling with the internal gender identity battle seems challenging enough, but after you’ve come to terms with your gender identity and decided to live as your authentic self, you may face discrimination, judgment, and even violence.  To read further, visit:  http://www.about-addiction.com/addiction/transgender-addiction/.

6 Steps for Hospitals to Take to Prevent Prescription Drug Abuse, Diversion

Hospitals are under increased scrutiny from regulatory agencies over prescription drug abuse and the potential for drug diversion from medical institutions. For hospital leadership, it is a patient safety issue. It is an employee health issue. It is a clinical quality and readmissions issue. And it is a legal and compliance issue.

The traditional approach to alleviating patient pain by using prescription opioids as the primary solution has created an environment where opioids are plentiful. And because hospitals hold a high inventory of regulated pharmaceuticals, they risk becoming a prime source of prescription drugs hitting the streets, where their value becomes highly inflated.

By taking a hard look at policies and oversight, hospital administrators can help reduce their institution’s risk of prescription drug in…..click here to read full article.

What’s Good for Mental Health is Good for the Economy

The Lancet PsychiatryExternal Web Site Policy recently reported that mental illness costs the global economy $1 trillion each year. In the United States alone, it’s estimated to cost approximately $105 billion in lost productivity and nearly $200 billion each year in lost earnings.  Approximately 30 percent of total disability costs are due to mental disorders.  These numbers have increased between 1990 and 2013 as the number of people with depression and/or anxiety around the world increased by nearly 50 percent.  Disasters and ongoing conflicts continue to contribute to these increases.  Yet, governments spend, on average, only 3 percent of their health budgets on mental health. For individual well-being……click here to read full article.

Let’s Treat it Together

LET’S TREAT IT TOGETHER – OPIATE ADDICTION VIDEO

A 20 minute video on opiate addiction in Ohio, including updated statistics, addiction theory, how medication assisted treatment may be utilized, inspiration from judges, and a call to action issued by our own Chief Justice.  It is a follow-up video to the Judicial Symposium on Opiate Addiction, which took place in Columbus on June 30, 2014.  Please click HERE to view the video.

 

Disaster Planning – Financial Preparedness

Are you financially ready for a disaster?  Have you ever even asked yourself that question?  Click here to become educated on this topic.  Additional resources may be found at http://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/96123

 

An app for mental illnesses…really? Check this out….

PsyberGuide provides information, reviews, and ratings on apps for mental health.  Click here to review their product list.  For example, you can find a product by on of the following listings, feel free to use any of the links below:

PsyberGuide-logo_circle_margin

Alcohol and the Holidays… two must reads:

The Truth About Holiday Spirits: How to Celebrate Safely This Season

We all want to celebrate during the holidays, and more people are likely to drink beyond their limits during this season than at other times of the year. Some will suffer adverse consequences that range from fights to falls to traffic crashes. Sadly, we often put ourselves and others at risk because we don’t understand how alcohol affects us during an evening of celebratory drinking.  Read more at:  http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/RethinkHoliday/NIAAA_NYE_Fact_Sheet.htm

Rethinking Drinking: Alcohol and your health

Do you enjoy a drink now and then?

Many of us do, often when socializing with friends and family. Drinking can be beneficial or harmful, depending on your age and health status, and, of course, how much you drink.  Read more at:  http://www.rethinkingdrinking.niaaa.nih.gov/

Coping when faced with emotional distress….

Incidents of mass violence such as the shootings in San Bernardino, CA and Savannah, GA on 12/2, Colorado Springs, CO on 11/27, and many others, can lead to significant levels of emotional distress or other behavioral health concerns among those impacted: survivors, loved ones of victims, first responders, rescue and recovery workers, or anywhere in the country, particularly among those who may have experienced a similar trauma and for whom news of these events may be especially distressing.

The following resources are from the Disaster Distress Helpline (DDH), a program of the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), administered by Link2Health Solutions, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Mental Health Association of New York City. For additional information, resources, or questions about the DDH, please contact Christian Burgess, Director, cburgess@mhaofnyc.org / 1-212-614-6346.

Disaster Distress Helpline: Overview

  • The Disaster Distress provides crisis counseling and support for anyone in the U.S. experiencing distress or other behavioral health concerns related to any natural or human-caused disaster. Calls (1-800-985-5990; Spanish-speakers can press “2”) and texts (text “TalkWithUs” to 66746; Spanish-speakers can text “Hablanos” to 66746) are answered by a network of independently-operated crisis centers around the country, who provide psychological first aid, emotional support, crisis assessment and intervention, and referrals to local/state behavioral health services for follow-up care & support.

DDH/SAMHSA Resources

  • See attached for a summary of DDH services/information (Overview of SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline.September 2015)  and a copy of the DDH brochure (Disaster Distress Helpline English Brochure.December 2014)  that can be forwarded to contacts or printed for use as a resource, including during the days/weeks/months ahead as this will no doubt be a long recovery process for those most directly impacted by the shootings.
  • Bulk copies of DDH brochures, wallet cards and/or topical brochures on common mental health concerns experienced by those impacted by incidents of mass violence (tips for talking with children, trouble sleeping, grief/loss, PTSD, etc.) can be sent to you/other contacts at no cost; if you/contacts are interested in receiving additional copies, contact Christian Burgess (cburgess@mhaofnyc.org) to coordinate.
  • The SAMHSA DDH website has a page dedicated to Incidents of Mass Violence distress risk factors and warning signs + resources for coping http://1.usa.gov/1FoyCwz that can be added to any online resource web pages created in relation to the San Bernardino shootings or other incidents of mass violence.
  • SAMHSA Coping with Traumatic Events: Resources for Children, Parents, Educators, and Other Professionals http://1.usa.gov/1NLO8ND
  • SAMHSA Behavioral Health Response App allows providers to access critical, disaster behavioral health-related resources for clients/contacts affected by incidents of mass violence  http://1.usa.gov/X7ctoE