Crisis Text Line – www.crisistextline.org

Your best friend. Your dad. That lady down the street. That quiet kid in school. That loud kid in school. That dude in accounting. Your cousin in Alaska. That hipster in the flannel in Brooklyn. That rando who might lurk online. Crisis Text Line is for everyone.

Crisis Text Line is free, 24/7 support for those in crisis. Text 741741 from anywhere in the USA to text with a trained Crisis Counselor.

Ohio is making it easier for individuals who are experiencing a stressful situation to find immediate help, 24/7 with the launch of a free, confidential, statewide Crisis Text Line. Starting today, any Ohio resident who needs help coping with a crisis can now text the keyword “4hope” to 741741 to be connected to a crisis counselor. Trained crisis counselors are on stand-by to provide a personal response and information on a range of issues, including: suicidal thoughts, bullying, depression, self-harm, and more. The specialist helps the user stay safe and healthy with effective, secure support. The keyword “4hope” was developed by the Stark County Mental Health and Addiction Recovery (StarkMHAR) board, which piloted a crisis text line for youth and young adults as part of the Strong Families, Safe Communities funding initiative supported by OhioMHAS and the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities.

Our Principles

  1. We fight for the texter. Our first priority is helping people move from a hot moment to a cool calm, guiding you to create a plan to stay safe and healthy. YOU = our priority.
  2. We believe data science and technology make us faster and more accurate. See our Founder’s TED talk for more scoop on how we’re using this stuff. While we love data science and technology, we don’t think robots make great Crisis Counselors. Instead, we use this stuff to make us faster and more accurate–but every text is viewed by a human.
  3. We believe in open collaboration. We share our learnings in newsletters, at conferences and on social media. And, we’ve opened our data to help fuel other people’s work.

OUR APPROACH

Q: IS CRISIS TEXT LINE COUNSELING?

A: No, our specialists do not counsel, but rather practice active listening to help texters move from a hot moment to a cool calm.

Q: WHAT IS ACTIVE LISTENING?

A: Active listening is when someone communicates in a way that is empathetic, understanding, and respectful. It includes focus on the texter and thoughtful answers.

Q: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN CRISIS TEXT LINE AND THERAPY?

A: Crisis Text Line is not a replacement for therapy. Therapy includes a diagnosis made by a doctor, a treatment plan of action, and a patient/therapist relationship. Crisis Text Line helps people in moments of crisis. Our crisis counselors practice active listening to help our texters find calm and create an action plan for themselves to continue to feel better. Crisis Text Line’s crisis counselors are not therapists.

Q: WHO STARTED CRISIS TEXT LINE?

A: We were founded by our CEO, Nancy Lublin. After seeing a need for the service we provide, Nancy hired a team to build what is our current platform. The original team included a data scientist and an engineer. Hear our story here.

Candlelight Vigil Promotes Healing

Candlelight Vigil 2014

Balloons let go at Candlelight Vigil in September 2014

 

The number of suicide deaths in Clermont County declined dramatically to 19 in 2015, compared to 35 in 2014 and 31 in 2013.

Lee Ann Watson, Associate Director of the Clermont County Mental Health and Recovery Board (MHRB), attributes that to more education about suicide prevention at Clermont schools, and more awareness of the county’s 24/7 crisis hotline, 528-SAVE (7283), which began in 2003.

So far this year, there have been 16 suicide deaths. On Sept. 14, Clermont County held its 15th annual candlelight vigil to remember loved ones whose lives have been lost to suicide. The vigil will be held 6:30-8 p.m. at Union Township’s Veterans Memorial Park.

MHRB has contracted with Child Focus, a nonprofit providing mental health services to youth and families, since 2003 to staff its crisis hotline. “Mental health professionals answer the phone and can assess whether a mobile crisis team needs to be sent out to the caller’s home,” Watson said.

Child Focus employees and independent contractors staff the hotline; all have at least a master’s degree and are licensed as a counselor, social worker, psychologist, or chemical dependency counselor. Six hotline responders have been with the team since it began in 2003.

In 2015, Clermont County Crisis Hotline answered 2,665 calls for help. That year, there were also 327 mobile crisis runs in the community, and 180 mobile crisis referrals were made by Clermont County law enforcement officers for follow-up, connection to treatment, and other needed resources. Through August 2016, Clermont County Crisis Hotline has taken 2,288 calls, made 224 runs, and received 130 referrals.

Watson says MHRB has been zealous in promoting the 528-SAVE number. The number has been distributed to law enforcement agencies throughout the county, to Clermont Public Library branches, to doctors’ offices and Clermont Mercy Hospital, to high schools and at community awareness workshops. It has also been advertised on Clermont Transportation Connection buses.

Child Focus also teaches a daylong seminar called Signs of Suicide at schools throughout Clermont County, Watson said. The training is offered to students and teachers, and has been conducted at Goshen, West Clermont and Milford schools.

“Students are taught to recognize signs of suicides, either in themselves or a friend, and to talk to an adult who can help them,” she said. Clermont school districts interested in receiving more information on the Signs of Suicide program can contact Susan Graham at Child Focus, 513-752-1555.

“Any life lost to suicide is one too many,” said Watson. “That is why it’s so important for people who are thinking about it to know that help exists. Our 528-SAVE number saves lives.”

 

Source:  http://www.clermontcountyohio.gov/2016/09/13/suicide-numbers-decline-in-clermont-county/?utm_source=Clermont+County+October+2016+Newsletter&utm_campaign=Clermont+County+October+2016+Newsletter&utm_medium=email

#VetoViolence: Suicide Prevention Video

In August 2015 the CDC and SAMHSA launched 1 Photo, 6 Words. #VetoViolence-an initiative that encouraged using social media to promote activities that prevent suicide. In late February 2016, a brief video was released featuring photos that suicide prevention professionals, public health practitioners, and others posted to Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. The video shows ways that people are giving hope and fostering resilience in families, relationships, workplaces, and communities across the country.

 

1 Photo, 6 Words. #VetoViolence: Suicide Prevention Video

In August 2015 the CDC and SAMHSA launched 1 Photo, 6 Words. #VetoViolence-an initiative that encouraged using social media to promote activities that prevent suicide. In late February 2016, a brief video was released featuring photos that suicide prevention professionals, public health practitioners, and others posted to Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. The video shows ways that people are giving hope and fostering resilience in families, relationships, workplaces, and communities across the country.  Here is our response:

 

 

 

 

Substance Abuse Resource Guide

We have compiled a service directory for residents of Clermont County to make it easier to locate resources within our immediate area.  Click on the following link:  Substance Use & Recovery Resource Guide 2015

Support Groups

Support Group for Individuals Who Have Lost Someone to Suicide.

When: 1st Wednesday of the Month

Where: Union Township Civic Center (Eastgate) in the Riverview Room (1st Floor)

Time: 6:00 – 7:30 pm

Any questions contact Liz Atwell at 513-721-2910 or email: eatwell@mhakyswoh.org